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Advertising Technology

We don’t block ads because they’re ugly, we block them because they’re invasive

Not too long ago, Google banned the AdNauseum extension from the Chrome Store. The reason they cited appears to be bogus. They also seem unwilling to discuss the real reason people use ad blockers. It’s not (just) because most online ads are ugly; it’s because they pose a privacy risk.

Advocates insist that ads aren’t just ugly, annoying, and bandwidth-sucking: They pose a risk to privacy, as the networks of software behind ads—cookies, trackers, and malware—watch not only where you go on the web but, through your phone and your purchases, what you do in real life. This data, which helps data brokers better understand you, includes everything from your health to your shopping and financial habits to your political and religious views.

But privacy is largely missing from Google’s discussion of problematic ads, says Howe. By avoiding mentioning AdNauseum’s actual intent, Google’s explanation for banning it echoes the advertising industry’s discussion of web ads, which focuses on aesthetics rather than privacy.

This is why I use Privacy Badger. If a site uses non-tracking ads, Privacy Badger won’t disable the ads. And I’m fine with that. I know ads are a necessary evil. But I don’t want ads to track me around the Internet, so I use Privacy Badger to protect me.

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Advertising

Cheerios’ #howtodad campaign is pretty rad

I’m pleased with the recent trend of commercials that show good dads. The joke about the clueless and useless dad is played out, no longer funny, and as insulting to the women the ads were targeting as it is to the men it mocks (after all, why would intelligent women marry and procreate with such pathetic losers?)

This Cheerios ad is just one of many in the new trend of “good dad” ads. I like it.

Categories
Advertising

Vintage Christmas Ads: Lucky Strike Cigarettes

Because nothing says “Merry Christmas” quite like a carton of cigarettes.